UCSF University of California, San Francisco      About UCSF       Search UCSF       UCSF Medical Center     
  Education & Training    Research    Patient Care   
 

Print This Page For Normal View, Click Here For Larger Font Sizes', Click Here


 
 
Student Research
General Information
Specific Programs
M.D. with Thesis
Dean's Prize and Poster Session
Additional Funding Options
Contact Information
 

Year-long Research Programs

Overview

One year (occasionally, two year) research programs are available through a variety of sources; however, they are competitive. Typically, about one-half to two-thirds of UCSF students who apply for such programs are successful in obtaining funding.


How to Schedule Yearlong Research

One year (occasionally, two year) research programs are available through a variety of sources; however, they are competitive. Typically, about one-half to two-thirds of UCSF students who apply for such programs are successful in obtaining funding. The year-long block can be taken between second and third or third and fourth years. However, the vast majority of students opt to take a research year between third and fourth year, as this is the point in training where you have gained the clinical perspective that is very useful for framing interesting research questions; it is also a convenient time to move out of the formal curriculum since you will be done with the Clinical Core, as well as (in most cases) at least one sub-internship. Year-long research programs generally begin in July and continue through the following June, although some flexibility for a slightly later start/finish date may be possible, depending on the agency.

Extension Options

If you extend your program, you have a few options regarding your enrollment status for the year:

1) continued enrollment in the School of Medicine

Advantages:

  • you will be able to take courses, including research electives, for credit, although this is generally not needed by most students
  • you will maintain your health, disability and malpractice insurance (the latter of which will allow you to participate directly in patient care if that is something you plan for the year).

Disadvantage:

  • you will need to pay tuition/fees, which explains why almost all students do not choose this option.

Importantly, if you choose this option, you must be enrolled in and fulfill all the requirements for one of the Pathway to Discovery programs.

2) the “Pathways to Discovery Certificate Program”

Advantages

  • you will be a student in the Graduate Division for the year) and maintain your health, disability and malpractice insurance
  • the fees (which are roughly $7,000 for the year) are usually covered by either the funding agency that is sponsoring you and/or the Office of Student Research

Disadvantage:

  • The main disadvantage is that you cannot take any courses for credit

Importantly, if you choose this option, you must be enrolled in and fulfill all the requirements for one of the Pathway to Discovery programs.

3) a leave of absence

Advantage:

  • you will not have any tuition or fees

Disadvantages:

  • you will not have malpractice insurance coverage (therefore not allowed to do any direct patient care)
  • you cannot take courses for credit

TOP

How to Extend

1) Consult with Financial Aid Office - all of these options may have a potential impact on your financial aid status (e.g. availability of additional aid, options for loan deferment). This is usually not a problem, but it is very important that you verify this with the Financial Aid Office.

2) Obtain approval of the Associate Dean for Student and Curricular Affairs - and complete a Request for an Extended Program form, available from the Office of Undergraduate Medical Education. If you are planning to take a leave of absence from school for the duration of your project you must notify the Registrar by filing a Withdrawal Petition, available in the Registrars Office .

One year (occasionally two) research programs are available through a variety of sources; however, they are very competitive. Typically, about one-half to two-thirds of UCSF students who apply for such programs are successful in obtaining funding. The year-long block can be taken between second and third or third and fourth years. These programs generally begin in July and continue through the following June, although some flexibility for a slightly later start/finish date may be possible, depending on the agency.

If you extend your program, you may choose to remain enrolled or take a leave of absence. Your decision on this should be based on several factors. First, you should consider the financial implications. If you remain enrolled, you must pay registration fees. If you are not enrolled, you need to obtain health insurance, you may be required to begin repayment of your educational loans, and you will not be eligible for financial aid. Second, will you have any clinical responsibilities during your research year. If you have patient contact (either as part of the research or in a volunteer setting), you must be enrolled in order to be covered by UCSFs malpractice insurance. Finally, do you want credit for your research hours. You can get elective credit only if you remain enrolled.

If you decide to extend your program, you must obtain approval of the Associate Dean for Student and Curricular Affairs and complete a Request for an Extended Program form, available from the Office of Curricular Affairs. If you are planning to take a leave of absence from school for the duration of your project you must notify the Registrar by filing a Withdrawal Petition, available in the Registrars Office.


Program Options

There are several agencies, foundations and subspecialty scientific societies that offer year-long fellowships for biomedical research. All provide stipends in the neighborhood of 20-29K per annum. Use the links at the RAP'tr website below to learn more:





Updated: May 17, 2012
    Site Map    Contact Info     ©UC Regents